Although best known for its spectacularly-mountainous dunes, this national park offers so much more. It’s spread over almost 50,000 sq km, covering vast swathes of the Namib Desert and encapsulating a sea of sand, as well as mountains, canyons and desert-adapted wildlife. Here are a few things not to miss. Sossusvlei: where waters flow and birds flock Although it’s the name almost entirely associated with Namibia’s enthralling dunes, Sossusvlei is actually no dune at all – rather it’s a flat ephemeral pan. When rare torrents fall from the skies once a decade or so, the Tsauchab River pushes west into the heart of the Namib and fills this remote basin. The presence of water here, in an area known for its complete lack of it, attracts wildlife and a remarkable array of birds. Once in Namib-Naukluft National Park, ask at the gate if there is water in Sossusvlei – if so, adjust your timings to allow for more time here to soak up the surreal aquatic environment and the life it brings to the desert (a picnic lunch here is a great idea after a morning of dune walking in the area). Of course, even when bone dry, Sossusvlei is … Continue reading Get the most out of Namibia’s greatest natural spectacle: Namib-Naukluft National Park

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The thrill of watching Africa’s epic wildlife in Botswana is made all the more special by experiencing the wondrous environments that nurture it. Explore the enchanting Okavango Delta, the rich habitats of the Chobe River valley and the blistering sands of the Kalahari Desert – what you find will astound you. Okavango Delta: reed-lined channels and isolated islands Much like a lung expanding and contracting with every breath, theOkavango Delta swells and shrinks (by an incredible 7000 sq km) with the comings and goings of floodwaters from the distant Angolan highlands. And these waters, like the oxygen we breathe, enable life to exist on a grand scale here. Depending on the time of year you travel, there are a variety of safari activities to take advantage of the inner delta’s changing habitat. When the water is at its peak, covering some 20,000 sq km between June and August, the delta is flooded with wildlife – some 200,000 animals arrive to drink its sweet waters and to feed on the erupting flora (or to eat the animals doing so). The aquatic environment and permanent blue skies allow you to enjoy the most quintessential Okavango experience – being poled through the myriad … Continue reading From delta to desert, with a river in between: a tale of three safaris in Botswana

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